Human 2 Human

Relationships with other humans have to be one of the most difficult and complex aspects of life. They are for me anyway, and there have been a few issues which have reared their ugly head for me in the past few days.

I know that friendships, family connections and intimate relationships are really hard for me and now days I am inclined to pull back from all of them.

With one failed marriage behind me, along with a string of failed relationships, I am alone and pretty certain that I will remain alone. I believe now that I not supposed to have  someone by my side. I have never believed that there is a soul mate for everyone, nor will everyone find their soul mate. Actually,I suspect my soul-mate might just have been and gone.  And sometimes circumstances just get in the way and block the way for what might have been true love.

On the other hand, it was some years ago now that I also came to the conclusion that close friendships were perhaps something I would be best to avoid. You may call it sad but I call it safe. After being let down by a number of friendships, I made a specific decision that friendships I might have been able to rely on were no longer worth it. Yes, I do have friends but not many and I try hard not to rely too much on them. I am inclined probably too much to withdraw rather than depend.

And then there is family. I have been fortunate to date with my family connections. Maybe they didn’t always understand me or my needs, but they did seem to love me. I think they still love me, but their availability  for me to rely on them is perhaps changing.

I know that my Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) plays a part in how I relate to other humans. I’d like to say it isn’t part of the story. I’d like to say that I have it ‘under control’. But it is part of me, part of my personality if you like, and no matter how many ways I learn to control or even recover, I know that it will always be there.

An article I read highlighted for me some of the issues that float in and out of importance as issues for me with BPD:

“Most patients named gaining control over emotions, mood swings and negative thoughts, followed by reduction of municipality, self-harm and other destructive behavior and improving self-acceptance and self-confidence. However, improving relationships and improvement of social participation, social competence and job situation has been mentioned as important.”

It speaks of the issues important to patients with BPD in the treatment they need. But I use it as it easily highlights in a paragraph issues I deal with when connecting Human 2 Human.

It’s hard. It’s constantly hard, and with those issues at play perhaps it is easier to understand why I choose so often to withdraw.

This week someone important to me said:

“I don’t care…” [about you]

Ouch! Actually, it was more than “ouch”. It was fuck! Under my breath, of course.

The rest of their words no longer mattered. I had heard that they “don’t care” I didn’t matter anymore. They possibly weren’t even aware of having said it, but it was loud and clear. Maybe this person was someone I could no longer rely on (for any number of reasons). Maybe this was connected to my having BPD. Maybe I was too much. Maybe I had misinterpreted what another person might have taken differently. But then maybe it was simply about their issues not connected to me. It hurt anyway.

Do you see why Human 2 Human is hard?

Another relationship came up on my Human 2 Human radar. I know my mother’s Alzheimer’s Disease is not about me, but how I respond to something that is ever-changing is totally about me. I can’t escape this one.

In a conversation with my mother, I discovered that her memory has gone so much that she appears to know nothing of my life beyond my name and that I am her daughter (I am thankful that she still knows this). She also appears to know nothing of her life when I have been a part of it. Of course, I knew that this was coming some day but that day had arrived and it cut deep. My own mother doesn’t know me. Maybe even I don’t exist for my mother anymore.

My father passed on nearly six years ago, and it seems that while my mother sits in front of me, she is in some way gone too. I have heard the expression of grieving for someone who still lives, and that is even harder than it sounds. I feel like the wind has been blown out of me.

My parents have always been very important to me, although I admit that my mother and I have never been close, never even been friends. The tension between us has gone now. Something I can’t totally explain. But maybe she has gone too.

Perhaps my feeling of loss this week connects to my BPD. I know there will be a connection because there always is. It’s just that I have yet to work it out, to be able to put it into words. Meantime it hurts. Both instances I have described here. I need to hide away and lick my wounds.

I want the luxury of time with my therapist again, but I have no therapist anymore.

All I can do is write. I don’t claim to have any answers. Just questions. I hope that what I choose to write and share with you makes even the tiniest ounce of sense. I suspect it will make more sense with others who travel with a Borderline mind.

Thanks for reading




Me And Mum

World Alzheimer’s Day – 21 September

Image credit: courtesy of digitalart at
Image credit: courtesy of digitalart at

I hadn’t intended to post again so soon after my last post, but World Alzheimer’s Day today is too good an opportunity to say let’s support the people in our communities who live with Alzheimer’s. People who have the disease, people who support those with the disease, and people who are employed in working with both groups of people.

In writing about Alzheimer’s and my family’s journey it is really important to me that I don’t take advantage of my mother’s plight. She deserves her privacy, something which she has always held tightly to. She doesn’t deserve to be some kind of joke. The struggle she lives with is real, but she is also real. She has feelings. Part of my task in supporting her is to protect those feelings, even though she might not be able to express or even understand them.

This post comes from my own reactions to my mother’s illness. I have tried to write from a perspective of my journey, rather than my mother’s. I hope that in doing so, I have preserved at least some of Mum’s right to privacy.

It’s funny how things happen. I think I would be pretty much the last person my mother expected or even wanted, to be there for her as she traverses her last years – with Alzheimer’s Disease.

“The phrase ‘Love one another’ is so wise. By loving one another, we invest in each other and in ourselves. Perhaps someday, when we need someone to care for us, it may not come from the person we expect, but from the person we least expect… [ someone] whose love for us has assigned them to the honorable, yet dangerous position of caregiver.”

Peggi Speers, The Inspired Caregiver: Finding Joy While Caring for Those You Love

Mum and I never got on. Not when I was a child and not for most of my adult life. It might seem harsh but the reality is that I think Mum and I tolerated each other for the sake of my (now late) father. I always got on great with Dad, but Mum didn’t appear to understand me and I didn’t understand her. I fully expected that when she was old, we would simply go our own ways.

My father died suddenly nearly six years ago. My parents had been temporarily living with me (after they lost their home in the Christchurch 2010/11 earthquakes). I remember the night after Dad’s funeral, I looked across the room at Mum and wondered how we would go from here. Mum hadn’t been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at that stage, but both Dad and I were clear that she was showing symptoms.

You see, Alzheimer’s runs in my family. My grandmother died of it, as did one of my uncles more recently. Earlier generations possibly bore it’s burden too. I have known it for most of my life, being only about ten when my grandmother was moved into residential care back in the late 1970’s.

Sadly, it’s something we have grown to expect. Mum never talked about this family heritage, but I’m sure she was probably quietly terrified. Frankly, I’m quietly terrified of it myself. But I’ll face that when I get there. My fear is not the focus for today.

It wasn’t long after Dad died that I got a very clear sense that he would want me to ‘be there’ for Mum. People have since told me “don’t be silly, he wouldn’t put that burden on you” but that’s not the way I saw it. To me, it was just one last thing I could do for him. I never stopped to see it as some type of burden. It was just the way it was going to be. Strangely, doing it for Mum never came into it back then. Supporting her would be definitely something I did for my father. Perhaps that’s just the way I needed to see it back then.

Mum was finally diagnosed about two years ago, but symptoms were obvious to those of us who were with her regularly, about six years earlier. And I’ve been learning ever since. I thought I knew the disease, but I really didn’t know anything until I learnt to live with it daily. There are new lessons each day.

Our relationship has changed enormously. It’s still not what I would call a typical close mother-daughter relationship. It never will be. Our relationship centres around her, and what she needs. My needs don’t really come into it. Some days that is really hard. Some days when I’m not well myself I want to scream “what about me?”. But mostly it’s okay. While Mum isn’t able to acknowledge it, I know that she needs me to prioritise her. This is her time now.

Mum needs me. She is living in a rest home, so yes, her basic needs are met. But I see her most days. I am clear that when I am not there, the staff take good care of her, but they are clear that Mum needs (and wants) my presence.

I’m the one that meets all Mum’s other needs. It might be the little things that no one would ever think of, or maybe bigger things like making decisions for her. I’m the one that notices the dirt on her shoes and stops to scrub it off just before taking her out to church. Maybe the dirt doesn’t matter, but it would have mattered to her… and so, now it matters to me.

Mum never appears to have any difficulty knowing who I am. She’s never once hesitated over my name and has no problem telling anyone who will listen that I am her daughter. That said, there are times when it’s quite clear to me that she is talking to me thinking I am my father. Other times I am a mystery third person, who she was eventually able to reveal to me was her sister (she never had a sister!).

I know that Mum has a great deal of difficulty knowing who most other people are. She’s confusing names or having to ask me who someone is. I admit that I try to keep the family names alive in her mind. I talk about my brothers (by name), about her grandchildren (again by name). I talk about my father because I can’t bear to think that she might forget the man she was married to for 53 years.

Maybe I do all of that for my own sake. Maybe I make decisions for her in such a way that will save me from having to see her suffer. I don’t know if it’s that I don’t want her to suffer, or that I can’t bear her suffering. Does that make sense? The two things are different to me.

Alzheimer’s Disease is a terribly cruel illness. I’m not the first person to write that. I see it’s cruelty daily as it robs little pieces of my mother.

I see the pictures in many Alzheimer’s publications of two brains side-by-side. On the left is a ‘normal’ brain and on the right is the smaller ‘Alzheimer’s’ brain. I wonder what my mother’s brain looks like now. How much has it shrunk? And for how long it can go on as it is? I don’t know.

The future of the journey which Mum and I are on is unknown. There is so much that is unknown. Each day, I don’t know what it will contain. Even though I already see my mother struggle so much, I know the struggle will only get worse. It’s just a matter of time. Will it be today? Or some time ahead?

What I do know, is that I have a remarkable opportunity to serve a woman, my mother, in her final days. What an honour. Seriously. I never thought I would say that, but Mum’s willingness to let me be there for her is a gift.

I read that “being a mother is about protecting your children from every conceivable thing that might cause them hurt”.  I’m not a mother myself but I now see my role as protecting my mother from everything that might cause her hurt. Sometimes I can achieve that but sometimes I can’t. At least I can try.

By choosing to look at our journey in these ways makes it bearable for me. I dearly hope that I am somehow making it bearable for Mum.

Thanks for reading




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Never Say Never


Image credit: தகவலுழவன் (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (], via Wikimedia Commons

Please Don’t Mess With My Meds

WARNING: This post does not contain the hope that might usually be found in my blog. I’m sorry about that, but I have to be real. I hope (yes, really) that ‘normal’ service may resume soon.

It’s pretty simple. Just don’t mess with my meds.

Don’t change anything, don’t add anything, don’t stop anything. That should be simple enough, shouldn’t it?

It’s like a huge cauldron of… smoke. Me.

Yes, smoke ( see the image above). The fire beneath burns red through the hot coals. You might not be able to see the coals, but I can. I can see them and I can feel them. They will burn me in their wake and if you get too close, they will burn you.

But the smoke? It looks innocent enough but will strangle, suffocate and kill you and me both. Even at a distance.

Did you read my last post? If you did you will know that I just experienced lithium toxicity (it’s not an experience I would recommend). That is, too much lithium in my blood.

Beyond what I wrote in that post, I was sent home from hospital to detox. That involved coming off the lithium, cold turkey. The withdrawal wasn’t too bad, perhaps because the symptoms of toxicity were pretty awful and over-rode absolutely anything else.

But that wasn’t the end of this issue. Nearly a month later…

I went back onto lithium and have suffered for the decision. Now, I have had two times when lithium toxicity was thought to be the issue resulting in some major physical symptoms, and a total of four changes in lithium dose.

This week my doctor suspected I was toxic again, but after more blood tests finally concluded (yesterday) that I wasn’t. My levels were simply ‘too high’ and I needed to come off lithium again.

I’m struggling to keep up with this,so I will completely understand if you are too.

The whole time what is most on my mind is my mood. When the doctors are most worried about my medical condition, and getting the lithium out of my kidneys. Yes, I get that is important, but my worry is my mental health. Four changes in dose of any drug for your mental health and you might just be reeling too.

It’s when people start messing with my meds that my mental health is what pays.

And now I’m paying. My mental health seems to be dropping by the day and perhaps the biggest thing addressed in my blog – hope – is nowhere to be seen.

Hope is replaced by irritability on a good day, and sheer raging anger (mostly contained internally) on the other days.

Hope is replaced by a belief that I am now completely alone. Everyone in my life has gone, or so it seems.

Hope is replaced by thoughts (but not plans or actions yet!!!) of self-destruction.

And of course, hope is replaced by paranoia. Somehow I have annoyed everyone in my life, and they hate me, so they have either left me (yes, alone again) or despise me.

Hope is replaced by depression (of the sad and angry type right now – no tears yet)

Hope is replaced by nothing. Void.

About a week ago I have to admit that I came scarily close to keying someone’s car. Yes, that’s right. I was going to take a key and run it down the side of this car, leaving hundreds of dollars of damage in my wake. For at least a moment, I didn’t care.

That’s not me! I have never vandalized anything before in my life, but I was so close to doing it. I didn’t. Somehow I woke myself up from a bad dream and walked away, relieved but more than a little bit shaken.

I have been here before.

Not the vandalism, but the Depression and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) taking over my functioning. It is perhaps most likely that the symptoms of these mental illnesses rear their ugly heads when people are messing with my meds (my physical AND pyschotropic).

Across the last 13 years I have tirelessly taken my prescribed medication every day. There wasn’t a day when I didn’t take the medication prescribed simply because I was terrified that if I missed a day, then I would go back to the psychiatric hell that was 1993 to 2003.

I had been told in 2003 that I would have to take two medications (particularly) for the rest of my life. One was lithium. I believed the doctor.

After my experience of (particularly) the last month, and admittedly some other problems I have had with the drug over the 13 years, it has been recommended that I come off lithium permanently.

The only problem I have with this is that the doctors involved seem only interested in my medical well-being. Sure, that is a major issue but my desperate desire not to return to what was the pit of hell for me, is a much greater issue for me. I don’t want to put my life at risk, and that is what it will involve. I know it.

The doctors treating me now didn’t know me when I was in that pit. Perhaps they think I am exaggerating how bad it was. I am terrified in the possibility I could go back.

When people (yes, doctors) mess with my meds, they have to consider ALL the consequences, and they have to be listening to ME. I know myself better than they do.

Of course I know that the worst may not happen if I come off lithium completely, but I have to do my darnedest to protect myself from the possibility. I would be crazy not too.

We would all be crazy to not do this when changes to our health regime are made.

Thanks for reading!



The Day The Music (Lithium) Died

It was Thursday when every came to a peak. I have been sick for nearly a year.

I’m talking sick beyond that which I would call ‘normal’. Because regular readers (and I know it’s difficult to be a regular reader when I haven’t been posting anything, so thank you for hanging in there) will know I have Fibromyalgia, which makes it hard to define anything as ‘normal’.

Getting doctors to hear me has been hard, but I have persisted. Over the year I have been diagnosed with Osteoarthritis, Stress, raised white cell counts and lowered kidney function.

But the music died with one last blood test. The results showed I had lithium toxicity. It was time for the music to die.

Lithium toxicity is serious. You can die from it, and that’s the reason my doctor sent me straight to hospital (do not pass go!). Not quite serious enough to warrant an ambulance, I spent yet more money (I don’t have!) on a taxi to the hospital beacuse by now I had been ordered to stop driving.

Yes, they’ve been expecting me. My bed was ready and my name was on the wall.

It’s fair to say that I was nervous (beneath the myriad of symptoms on display and feeling decidedly unwell. Check Google if you want to know about the symptoms ). I know some doctors don’t understand that not all lithium users have Bipolar. I don’t. I was prescribed lithium for chronic suicidality and treatment-resistant depression. At the time, no one realised I had Borderline Personality Disorder.

But the more pressing concern I had is that not all doctors understand that you don’t just stop lithium. What I needed was a psychiatrist, who understood these things, but at that time of day, there was not a chance.

I was to a large extent, now at the mercy of the medical profession. Many hours passed as I lay in my allocated bed next to the nurses’ station (read that this means they were fairly concerned about me). I was in an assessment unit, and with my barely functioning head, I watched staff go hither and thither assessing what I guess is about 40 medical patients.

Eventually, the rush of staff around my bed died off. I wondered why, but later came to the conclusion they had decided I’m not about to die. Phew!

Finally, a fully-fledged doctor (read not simply a medical student sent in to ask all the embarrassing and not-so-embarrassing questions) came and announced that my lithium intake has to stop (immediately), and I had been admitted for four to five days, to “watch and see what happens”. Now, that’s scary!

My heart sunk. I’d been in plenty of hospital beds before, and I knew I didn’t want this. To start with, the pillow was horrendous (I was well enough to have worked this out). I was struggling to speak by now (probably the toxicity but no one is really sure) but I struggled to utter that I’d rather do this waiting at home.

Several more hours passed before the head doctor arrives at my bed. She agreed that I can do the waiting at home (the New Zealand Health System is such that I knew ‘they’ wouldn’t want to keep me in an expensive hospital bed if they don’t need to) but she lists off her demands. Blood tests every day, no lithium, etc… go directly to hospital if I feel worse.

Several more hours passed before the paperwork is done and I am discharged into what is a cold, winter night.

An aside at this point is that I am scared of the dark. Yes, an adult scared of the dark. Actually terrified. Think PTSD. I am alone and I am still feeling dreadfully unwell. I’m still struggling to speak. Oh and my heart rate is still pounding. But sent off into the night I had been and eventually I found a taxi home. I somehow convinced the driver to drive up my long drive to stop at my front door.

So the music (lithium) had been stopped. Remember when I said I was nervous that this would happen. Well, now I am terrified. For 13 years I have taken lithium (perhaps religiously) and in that time I have regularly been told that I should not stop taking my lithium. I realise this is something of a medical emergency, but still… I’m not meant to stop taking my lithium.

And what is going to happen now?

I describe lithium as music simply because taking lithium set the music going again. It saved my life. I went from an out-of-control, mentally ill, struggling-to-stay -alive (Scrub that! I was doing everything I could to end my life) person. I had been like that for about 10 years. It’s amazing that I hadn’t achieved my purpose. In desperation (because me and the doctors had tried everything) the doctor suggested lithium. And it changed my life. Maybe not overnight, but in time the music started again. My life was back. Obviously life was changed, but the important thing was that I had it back.


At this point, I have been off lithium for six days and I see my doctor today to decide what happens next. Do I go back onto lithium or do I accept that lithium has done its day and I can’t have it anymore?

And that’s what terrifies me. What happens to me if I don’t have lithium? It saved my life. Ok, so it turned my life around. I am still alive because a doctor had the sense to try just one more drug. And she got the ‘right’ drug for me.

I am scared terrified that my mental health will plummet into the depths. Will my hold on life disintegrate? I simply don’t want to go back to the life I struggled with 13 years ago. No hope. No desire to live.

My ability to blog has been seriously affected by my health over the last year. It hasn’t just been about lithium toxicity, but rather a whole lot of issues that have yet to be resolved (or at least managed). That said, I love writing and I love blogging. I am going to try to get this going again. That way you can read what happens next, and maybe I can share the hope.

Meanwhile, some music:

Thanks for reading



I’ve Got Nothing To Complain About

First things first, let me say that I have been missing in action for too long. Somewhat ironically to this post, I have been sick. This is something I have been living with symptoms for about six months now (I know this is relatively nothing).

With this physical illness has been a bad dose of brain fog. If you’ve had it you’ll appreciate why it’s hard to write while dealing with a brain that amongst other issues, I haven’t been able to finish my sentences and I have been mixing up my words, if I can at all bring to the surface of brain the words I want in the first place. I still have little idea as to the ‘why’ of the illness. That question is yet to be answered. I try to take advantage of the good days, and so far, this is one.

I have only been anywhere near homeless once. Nearly 20 years ago. I use the word ‘homeless’ with what has to be a stretch of the imagination, but I use it for a purpose. At the time, I was mentally ill. Actually, that mental illness was far out of control and I was usually (at the time) resident in a psychiatric hospital. Actually, I spent most of 1997 as an inpatient, sometimes as a voluntary patient, and others as an involuntary patient. Neither was pleasant.

One day I was given the opportunity to go on a ‘van outing’. Wow! I don’t remember my status as a patient at the time, but I know that because I had been self-harming, I was initially told I couldn’t go, until the last-minute. While out on the van trip (to get ice-cream) I chose to run away, with another patient. There was no plan to run, on part anyway, just making the most of the opportunity. I am still embarrassed by my actions, given circumstances I took advantage of. It was plainly wrong, in so many ways. There was no way that staff could stop us because of the staff member’s incapacity. That’s why we did it.

I split up from my co-conspirator fairly quickly. She was largely interested in getting drugs, not something I was after. I spent the rest of the day walking the streets of Wellington, New Zealand trying to avoid the possibility of seeing anyone I knew, or being caught by Police. I had soon self-harmed and needed medical treatment, but I kept walking anyway. I didn’t want treatment.

For a ‘few’ hours I had no home, that was accessible to me anyway. Eventually, I was picked up by Police, taken to the local Emergency Department before being escorted back to the psychiatric hospital.

Why have I told you this? It was a long time ago but it was the closest I ever came to being homeless. I recognise that I wasn’t homeless. I just couldn’t go home. And I didn’t want to either.

Today I read an article about having a chronic illness while being homeless (in the United States). It focused on chronic physical illness, which I am now battling more than I was then battling mental illness. The article opened my eyes to something I had not stopped to consider. Living in my nice warm home with chronic illness, I have nothing to complain about when compared to the hardship faced by homeless people living with chronic illness.

Have a read.

The Impossibility of Managing a Chronic Disease While Homeless by Maralyssa Bann

“Living on the street, even something as simple as finding a place to store medicine can be an insurmountable challenge.”

It made me think about my attitude to my own illness. I have got nothing to complain about. I hope you are challenged in reading the article too.

Thanks for reading



Fighting Tooth And Nail

That’s what I am doing. Fighting ‘Tooth and Nail’. Nothing seems easy and it’s as if it’s one thing after another. Know the feeling?

When I was at high school I read a book that affected me profoundly. It was New Zealand book Tooth And Nail: the story of a daughter of the Depression by Mary Findlay. I read it firstly because at the time I was interested in the era of The Great Depression. I think we had been studying it in History class. My second reason for reading it was that the author, Mary Findlay was the great-grandmother of one of my closest friends.

She fought Tooth and Nail.  Amazon describe the book as this:

“This a the true story of Mary Findlay during the bitter days of the Depression. When her mother dies and her drunkard father harasses her, Mary is forced to fight tooth and nail for food, work and a place to live.”

It affected me profoundly not just because of the connection to my friend but also that it was a life lived much harder than anything I had ever known. My life seemed easy by comparison.

Right now nothing seems easy. There is one thing after another. I’m sure there are those in my life who still think I have it easy. I don’t have a 60 hour a week job, I don’t have, say four children, nor do I have a partner to think about. It’s true. Compared to Mary Findlay’s life I perhaps have it easy. But to me, nothing seems easy right now. And when it all boils down, it is the person’s own perception that matters.

I could easily write a post about each of what I see as my current hardships. But I haven’t. Mostly because at the time there haven’t been words, and so you won’t have seen posts from me since before Christmas. But here is a taste.

  • My 88-year-old (yes, she had a birthday) is deteriorating fast. Her physical health continues to be great, but her mental health in the form of Alzheimer’s Disease is going down hill fast. I’m learning as I go. Some days there is little to recognise the woman she was in my growing up years. And tomorrow? I face what happens to Mum next in terms of the care she needs now.
  • My doctor stripped me of Fibromyalgia. He says I don’t have it, even after four years of being treated for it and having originally been diagnosed with it by a doctor with more qualifications and experience. Apparently I simply need some Art Therapy (yes, really!) to cure my symptoms. Thankfully a few weeks after this pronouncement he announced he was leaving the country permanently. I am to be assigned a new doctor, and time will tell just what s/he will have to say.
  • My dentist has just presented me with a whopping $2,000 (that’s a whole lot of money in NZ) quote for the work I need to stop some corrosion happening in my mouth. Hear this, if you take medication regularly. The $2,000 problem is caused by dry mouth and having been on lithium for the last 12 or so years. Both of these have a terrible effect on teeth. Right now I’m still trying to pick myself up off the floor. I was gobsmacked! I am likely to have these dental issues for the rest of my life (if I listen to my Psychiatrist and stay on the medication for life, as we have previously agreed). I have no idea how I will possibly pay for this work but meanwhile, I am eating only soft foods to avoid further corrosion to my teeth (particularly my front teeth).
  • And I can’t forget the fibro symptoms of mainly pain and fatigue. You know the fibro that I don’t have? Well, those symptoms continue with more fatigue than ever. I go deal with whatever needs dealing, and then come home and collapse, literally. Day after day.

That’s just a taste, perhaps the really big issues, and maybe that doesn’t seem like a ‘tooth and nail’ battle. But it is. Like I suggested above, it’s how it seems to me that really matters. I might not be in the middle of the Great Depression like Mary Findlay, but it seems like my own ‘tooth and nail’ battle (emphasis on the ‘tooth’ because if I don’t find $2,000 soon I’ll be looking at whatever a pair of dentures cost).

It was a long time ago that I read Mary Findlay’s book but I still remember the impact it had on me. Maybe I didn’t learn this at the time I read the book but I know now that we can’t compare our hard times. As a 15-year-old reading that book, I thought her life was incredibly hard and mine incredibly easy. Actually, I was having my own pretty hard time back then, but I gave no value to my hardship. Now I have learnt that behind the scenes other people can be having incredibly difficult times. Harder than we can imagine. And it really isn’t possible to compare.

If I was to ask each one of you what are the hard things in your life right now, you could probably come up with your own list (like mine above but different). We all have our hardships, and all of those can have a bearing on  mental and physical health. Whether we tell others of our hard stuff or not, it’s there and we’re probably fighting a ‘tooth and nail’ battle to simply keep afloat.

I haven’t listed my current hardships out of wanting sympathy. Or wanting you to say you’re sorry for me. Rather I share it with you because maybe it reminds you that we’re not alone. We all are probably fighting ‘tooth and nail’. Life is hard, but we don’t do it alone. Just because your hard stuff is different from mine, it doesn’t stop me from being aware that you’re having a hard time. And that, makes a difference to me, so perhaps it makes a difference to you.

Thanks for reading




Bewildered was reflected in my eyes. I hadn’t seen it before, but there was something devastatingly familiar in that look. I couldn’t turn away from it.

I had been Bewildered in times past. It came as a symptom often not recognised, from too many anti-depressants, benzodiazepines, antipsychotics and even too much ECT (yes, it is possible to have too much). Those left me with little idea of the world around me. I didn’t know the people around me. I didn’t know the world around me. I was a little bit scared but mostly I didn’t care.

The Bewildered now reflected in my eyes was mostly not there to reflect mine in the days I needed it. I was mostly alone. It’s not that they didn’t care. I had just pushed away anyone who cared. I had moved away to places no one knew me. Those that cared were few in number. Well, that’s what Bewildered wanted me to believe.

Actually many people, admittedly at a distance, cared. Actually, many people, family and friends, wanted to care, but I couldn’t see it. Perhaps it was the psychosis, the depression or perhaps it was the drugs… they wanted me to think I was alone. Actually, Alone was the last thing I needed. Alone would kill me if I let it.

It’s what made me think when I saw Bewildered staring back at me last night. Alone is the last thing that Bewilderment needs. It’s not that it would kill them. Well, not yet and not in the way it threatened to kill me.

It is easier to stay away. Because it’s difficult. What do I say? How do I respond to Bewildered’s strange statements? How do I stay, when Bewildered seems to push me away?

I’m lucky in a way. I have my Grandfather’s example to follow. He wasn’t alive by the time I faced my Bewildered, but I know what he would have done because I’d seen him do it before. He would stare Bewildered straight in the face, and say, “I’m not leaving you”. And he didn’t.

Whatever Bewildered you find reflected in your eyes, I challenge you to stare them straight back in the face and say “I’m not leaving you.” It seems so small, but maybe if it can take out a little of the fear that Bewildered faces alone, it has to be worth it. It will probably be difficult, but still worth it.

“Peace. It does not mean to be in a place where there is no noise, trouble or hard work. It means to be in the midst of these things and still be calm in your heart.”

 – Unknown

Peace is something that even the Bewildered deserve. No matter where that Bewildered is sourced, I believe that I can help someone Bewildered find even just a little of their own peace just by being willing to let that Bewildered be reflected back in my eyes. In that, they are not alone.

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Never Say Never

I did say ‘never’. More than once. Actually I said it repeatedly for about 20 years. That’s a long time to say ‘never’ but I was sure of myself. I was sure that I never wanted to do this again. I’d been, got burnt several times, and wasn’t going to go there ever again.

About six months ago I had my first inkling that perhaps I had said ‘never’ with a little too much certainty. But I had never pictured myself in this situation, ever. While I was still saying ‘never’, I was starting to realise that I might have to change my mind sometime in the future.

I can tell you that I hate that! Having been adamant for so long, having been sure that this would never happen, and now because of a number of decisions I had made over recent years, I knew that I should never have said ‘never’. Never say never, Cate!

I have shared in past posts that my mother has Alzheimer’s Disease. It’s a cruel disease. Everyone says that but I had little idea just how cruel it was. I had seen my grandmother’s journey through Alzheimer’s. An uncle’s journey more recently. And one thing that’s sure is that I’m nowhere near the end of this Alzheimer’s journey yet. I know now that contrary to past thinking, it’s a much worse experience for my mother than it will ever be for me.

I remember being told “at least they don’t know what is happening to them”. That was a somewhat comforting thought. Just yesterday someone told me “they’re really already dead” (ouch!). But research has now found that patients do know. It’s just they don’t know what they can do about it. It’s a good reminder to me that no matter how hard this is for me, it is much worse for my mother. That’s enough for me to never say ‘never’.

For all of her life, my mother has gone to church. It has been central to her life as a child and as an adult. She was married to a minister. Now it continues to be a key aspect of her life, although she is more limited in the extent of her church activities. Apart from perhaps when she has been in hospital (rarely) I can’t think of a time when she didn’t go to church on Sunday.

When mum had to give up her driver’s licence and so couldn’t get herself to church, we set up a system where another brother (who went to the same church) would pick her up and take her to church. I would be waiting outside church at the end of the service to take mum home. Many times I have been invited to go to church with her, but I was saying ‘never’… quite firmly. I had absolutely no intention of going. But the system we had set up worked.

For a big chunk of my life, I had gone to church. I had grown up in a minister’s family so church was central to our family activities. As an adult, I had continued to go to church.

Several things happened in my teens and twenties. They dulled my enthusiasm, although I never said anything and I kept up my participation. When I was first diagnosed with a mental illness, in my late 20’s, a number of statements made to me by a few unwise people, left me concluding that church was no longer the place for me. I felt judged, and I felt uncared for. To the extreme perhaps, people who had hurt and abused me were somewhat more important to some church people than I was. My needs for safety and protection were seemingly unimportant. My experience was that church was not the compassionate and accepting place they said it was.

And so I stopped going to church… about 20 years ago.

Until now.

My thinking has driven me further away from the church. But just sometimes, it’s necessary to put that aside. My mother now needs someone to be with her when she goes to church, otherwise she probably wouldn’t be able to go for much longer.

I made a choice. I would go to church with her until the point where she can no longer go (with me).

Aside from my own beliefs and thoughts, I’m not ready to see mum unable to go to church. It is very important to her, even with her disease. For some reason that I don’t fully understand yet, I’m prepared to help her keep it in her life.

Ok, so I have only been once so far. There is little that has changed in 20 years, except some of the music. It wasn’t somewhere I felt comfortable, but my comfort was not what this exercise was about. I don’t call myself a Christian, and suspect that will continue. I didn’t agree with everything that was said. It is a middle-class church and I wondered where the inclusion of others was.

But I will be there, with her, again this Sunday. And the Sunday after. And for as long as Mum can make it.

This is about being there for my mother. Making sure that something so important to her remains in her life, and setting aside my own thinking, I hope, for her sake,  that we can keep doing this. You see, when we can’t keep going, a very large chunk of mum’s life will have been taken away by Alzheimer’s. And that will be tragic.

It’s going to be a hard road for me. But I am willing to do it, not because I love her but simply because I hate to see this disease swallow up someone’s life before it has to.

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“looking at my reflection, in the window opposite, hollow and translucent, I see a woman disappearing. It would help if I looked like that in real life – if the more the disease advanced, the more ‘see-through’ I became until, eventually, I would be just a wisp of a ghost. How much more convenient it would be, how much easier for everyone, including me, if my body just melted away along with my mind. Then we’d all know where we were, literally and metaphysically.”

― Rowan Coleman, The Day We Met

Vicious Circle

It goes round and round. Each time the circle escalates and the effects grow more.

Stress causes Pain cause Stress

Oh, and add in depression.

It looks like this:

Image credit:
Image credit:

I have one month to find somewhere else to live.  At that time, the repairs to earthquake damage to my home will finally begin. Don’t get me wrong. Because I’ve been waiting nearly five years, I am happy that they are finally about to start. Very happy. The repairs will take approximately six months.

The biggest stress right now is that I hope my insurance company are going to help with the costs of shifting and somewhere to live. But they won’t tell me how they will help (I mean specifics beyond what the policy document says) until the insurance company doing the repairs provide a specific completion date. I’m waiting. And I understand because they can’t finalise exactly how long the work will take until they lift up the floor and see just how bad things are down there. Meantime though, what my insurance company want is a best estimate.

The reason that’s the biggest stress for me right now is because I can’t find somewhere to live until I know what assistance I’m getting. You see I expect to have to pay three to four times what I am currently paying in rent. Yes, three to four times! And that is more than I get in income each week. I REALLY need my insurance.

My current rent is low, thanks to my family who own the property. But equally rents in Christchurch have skyrocketed since the quakes because of demand for housing, and a little bit (that’s generous!) because many landlords have been mean and taken advantage of the situation.  The Government keeps reporting that rents are coming down again, but not when you look at what is advertised. Rent is still really steep. The demand for rentals is not as great as it was maybe two to three years ago. Repairs are getting completed and homeowners are moving home. But it’s still not going to be easy.

So there is plenty of stress in my life, and the vicious circle kicks in because, for me, stress is the biggest trigger to fibromyalgia symptoms. Stress equals pain. And pain equals stress because pain means I can get less done. And when pain goes on, increasing stress, then I start to get depressed. Or more accurately, more depressed. Oh, and add in fatigue… and an unhealthy amount of brain function. In other words I can hardly function at all and I’m hardly likely to come over as a great budding tenant to an agent or landlord.

This week I have been in a lot of pain all week (it’s Thursday here). I have rated my pain  as “being able to leave the house several times a week. Moderate to severe symptoms much of the time. Able to do about 2 hours a day of work at home or activity like housework, shopping and using the computer“.

I have limited activity to visiting my mother (she has Alzheimer’s and doesn’t really understand why I can’t visit her). I don’t know for sure but I suspect an Alzheimer’s patient works on the way many people choose to view Invisible illness. S/he can’t see it so it doesn’t exist. Maybe that’s a bit harsh, but I think it’s something like that. Certainly there is little understanding. From Mum’s perspective, I get it. Some others, I’m not so charitable.

Of course, Mum’s illness simply adds to my stress. Today I decided to say “no” and not visit her. I wondered whether by keeping up the daily visits, whether I was exacerbating my own illness.

There are actually more and more facets to my vicious circle. What I really need is that completion date and then the details of how my insurance company will help me. Right now insurance companies are not my favourite people…

Instead of focusing on the negative, the positive is that by mapping out that vicious circle I actually remind myself what is going on. Better yet, maybe I can stop it all winding up just through awareness. I know for myself that if I can limit the flow of stress then I can limit the onset of pain and depression. And that will make for a happier Cate. Anything for that!

PS. By the way, do you remember Lucy? Lucy is my music hallucinations, and she continues. This week she is louder and more invasive than ever. I’m starting to think that Lucy is also affected by stress.


Stigma Via Health Professionals

This is my latest post for A Canvas Of The Minds. It was posted yesterday. I apologise for my lateness in sharing.

“Am I alone with this? Have you been on the receiving end of stigma from health professionals, be it general health or mental health?  How have you handled it and what effect has it had on the overall treatment of your health issue? If it isn’t something you have experienced, how would you handle it if you came across such stigma?”

Read on at: Stigma Via Health Professionals

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